SPACE

July 20, 2019 is the Golden Anniversary of the first ever moon landing!

To celebrate this milestone in human achievement, Truthian artists have painstakingly prepared a series of commemorative items. Starting with the Mission Patches which represent the thousands of men and women who worked to make each mission possible.

So join us in exploring and celebrating the history of Apollo!

 
 

 Mission Patches

Each of the 12 manned Apollo missions had a patch. To commemorate the 50th anniversary of the moon landing, we’ve made them all available to you!

 

Patches are dyed.

 

Check out the brief summaries of each mission. Have a favorite mission? We have you covered. In addition to the patches you can get the mission design on the item of your choice. If you’re looking for something not listed, contact us.

 
 

 Apollo Program

The Apollo Program was the most aggressive and daring space program ever attempted by the United States. The goal? Put a man on the moon in less than 10 years . . . and bring him home.

 
Courtesy of  NASA

Courtesy of NASA

In 1961 the United States was not leading the space race. Just over a month after Yuri Gagarin’s historic flight, President John F. Kennedy made his inspirational speech to congress. It was both a call to action for the American people and a challenge to the USSR.

The Apollo 11 landing on July 20, 1969 is often seen as the fulfillment of President Kennedy’s challenge. Though with “and bring him home” the challenge was fulfilled when the astronauts were recovered by the USS Hornet from the capsule’s landing zone in the Pacific Ocean 4 days later.

The Apollo program, also known as Project Apollo, was NASA’s third manned space program following on the heels of Mercury and Gemini.  The program put 12 men on the moon. An unparalleled achievement.

The mission numbers are a bit wonky, the reason for this is that after the Apollo 1 tragedy the planned mission schedule was revised extensively. Test flights of the Saturn rockets were dubbed as Apollo missions. Manned missions resumed with Apollo 7.

A few Apollo statistics:

  • Cost: $25.4 Billion in 1973 (equivalent to $145.4 billion in 2019)

  • Duration: 1961 to 1972

  • Missions: 12 manned, 6 unmanned

  • Launch Vehicles: Saturn IB, Saturn V

 Apollo 1 Mission

Courtesy of  NASA

Courtesy of NASA

The most tragic of the Apollo missions, Apollo 1 was the only Apollo mission to result in loss of crew. On January 27, 1967 during a capsule only test, a fire in the pure oxygen environment killed the crew.

In honor of the crew the mission name was retired and the patch designed by the crew remained in the official insignia of the mission.

A few statistics:

  • Crew: Virgil I. "Gus" Grissom, Ed White, and Roger B. Chaffee

  • Launch Vehicle: Saturn IB

  • Date: planned February 21, 1967

 Apollo 7 Mission

Courtesy of  NASA

Courtesy of NASA

Just 21 months after the Apollo 1 tragedy Apollo 7, completed the intended mission of Apollo 1. The crew completed the first test of the newly redesigned command module with the service module. The mission was both NASA’s first 3 man crew and the first televised broadcast of footage from inside a spacecraft.

A few statistics:

  • Crew: Walter M. Schirra, Donn F. Eisele, and R. Walter Cunningham

  • Launch Vehicle: Saturn IB

  • Date: October 11 - 22, 1968

 Apollo 8 Mission

Courtesy of  NASA

Courtesy of NASA

Flying a mere 2 months after Apollo 7’s successful flight Apollo 8 became the first manned mission to leave Low Earth Orbit (LEO). The crew became the first humans to orbit the moon and see earthrise. This was the first manned launch of the Saturn V rocket.

A few statistics:

  • Crew: Frank Borman, James Lovell, and William Anders

  • Launch Vehicle: Saturn V

  • Date: December 21 - 27, 1968

 Apollo 9 Mission

Courtesy of  NASA

Courtesy of NASA

Apollo 9 was first manned test of the Lunar Module (LM) with the command and service module. The crew successfully docked, undocked, and redocked the LM. This was of paramount importance for the mission to the moon because the LM would need to redock with the command module for transit back to earth.

A few statistics:

  • Crew: James McDivitt, David Scott, and Rusty Schweickartdock

  • Launch Vehicle: Saturn V

  • Date: March 3 -13, 1969

 Apollo 10 Mission

Courtesy of  NASA

Courtesy of NASA

The dress rehearsal for the moon landing. The crew went through all of the mission parameters except actually landing. Passing within 15.6 km of the lunar surface before redocking with the command module.

A few statistics:

  • Crew: Thomas Stafford, Eugene Cernan, John Young

  • Launch Vehicle: Saturn V

  • Date: May 18 - 26, 1969


 Apollo 11 Mission

“One small step for man, one giant leap for mankind.”

Courtesy of  NASA

Courtesy of NASA

On July 20,1969 Apollo 11 landed on the moon, effectively winning the Space Race. Upon realizing the computer was targeting an area of boulders Armstrong manually landed the Lunar Module, Eagle, with less than a minute of fuel remaining.

After 21.5 hours on the lunar surface they returned leaving behind a US flag, a silicon disk of messages, and commemorative medallions for the Apollo 1 crew and 2 cosmonauts who had died in accidents.

A few statistics:

  • Crew: Neil Armstrong, Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., Michael Collins

  • Launch Vehicle: Saturn V

  • Date: July 16 -24, 1969

  • Landing Site: Tranquility Base


 Apollo 12 Mission

Courtesy of  NASA

Courtesy of NASA

The second crew to land on the moon. The landing site was purposefully close to Surveyor III, a previous robotic mission. While collecting moon rocks they also collected parts from Surveyor III for analysis. The crew spent 31.6 hours on the surface before rendezvousing with the command module, the Yankee Clipper. The patch include a clipper ship in it.

A few statistics:

  • Crew: Charles Conrad Jr., Alan L. Bean, Richard F. Gordon Jr.

  • Launch Vehicle: Saturn V

  • Date: November 14 - 24, 1969

  • Landing Site: Ocean of Storms


 Apollo 13 Mission

“Houston, we’ve had a problem.”

Courtesy of  NASA

Courtesy of NASA

Probably best know due to the successful Hollywood film, Apollo 13. While enroute to the moon, one of the oxygen tanks exploded leading to no oxygen and limited battery power for the command module. Despite multiple challenges, the crew was able to shelter in the lunar module and return safely to earth.

A few statistics:

  • Crew: James A. Lovell Jr., Fred W. Haise Jr., John L. Swigert Jr.

  • Launch Vehicle: Saturn V

  • Date: April 11 -17, 1970


 Apollo 14 Mission

Courtesy of  NASA

Courtesy of NASA

Delayed by 4 months due to the Apollo 13 accident this was the third mission to land on the moon. The mission commander, Alan Sheppard, was both the oldest member of the astronaut corps at the time, and the only of the Mercury 7 to reach the moon.

A few statistics:

  • Crew: Alan B. Shepard Jr., Edgar D. Mitchell, Stuart A. Roosa

  • Launch Vehicle: Saturn V

  • Date: January 31 - February 9, 1971

  • Landing Site: Fra Mauro Formation

 Apollo 15 Mission

Courtesy of  NASA

Courtesy of NASA

The fourth mission to land on the moon and the first to use the Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV). Primarily a science mission the crew spent nearly 67 hours on the lunar surface before heading home.

A few statistics:

  • Crew: David R. Scott, James B. Irwin, Alfred M. Worden

  • Launch Vehicle: Saturn V

  • Date: July 26 - August 7, 1971

  • Landing Site: Hadley-Apennine


 Apollo 16 Mission

Courtesy of  NASA

Courtesy of NASA

The fifth mission to land on the moon. The crew spent 71 hours on the lunar surface, more than 20 of those on Extravehicular Activity (EVA). Travelling more than 16 miles they brought back over 200 pounds of lunar samples.

A few statistics:

Crew: John W. Young, Charles M. Duke Jr., Thomas K. Mattingly II

Launch Vehicle: Saturn V

Date: April 16 - 27, 1972

Landing Site: Descartes


 Apollo 17 Mission

Courtesy of  NASA

Courtesy of NASA

In addition to being the sixth and final landing on the moon, it was the final crewed mission and the only night launch of the Saturn V. The crew spent 75 hours on the surface gathering  243.4 pounds of lunar samples during the 22 hours of Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA).

A few statistics:

  • Crew: Eugene A. Cernan, Harrison H. Schmitt, Ronald E. Evans

  • Launch Vehicle: Saturn V

  • Date: December 7 - 19, 1972

  • Landing Site: Taurus-Littrow